Aconcagua, Asado & Vino

  • Dates: Dec 30 – Jan 18 2016
  • Duration: 20 days
  • Level: Intermediate
  • Client Ratio: 4:1
  • Amount of Participants: Min. 2 / Max. 8
  • Cost: $3,750
  • What the price includes:
    • Guide service (UIAGM certified)
    • Scheduled hotel accommodations, based on double or triple occupancy*
    • Group camping, cooking and climbing gear.
    • All ground transportation
    • Food while on the mountain
    • Mules to carry the equipment (30 kg/pax) in-out Base Camp
  • What the price does not include:
    • Transportation to Argentina.
    • Aconcagua Province Park permit ($480-720 depending on season).
    • High altitude porters. (to increase your odds of success, porter support is available)
    • Personal equipment or items of a personal nature (phone calls, laundry, etc.).
    • Medical evacuation, climbing/trip insurance and rescue expenses as needed.
    • Alcoholic beverages.
    • Extra nights in hotel in case of early return to the city.
    • Any expenses associated with early departure from the trip.
    • Staff/guide gratuities.
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Aconcagua: the perfect climb after Chimborazo! This is the ideal way to refine your high-altitude climbing skills. Aconcagua, the highest mountain of South America, is one of the Seven Summits, Cerro Aconcagua (aka “Stone Sentinel”) reaches 6962m making it the highest mountain of the Western Hemisphere. Swiss alpinist Matthias Zurbriggen was the first to successfully climb the Aconcagua via today’s normal route in 1987.

The ascent through the Vacas valley provides the best way to acclimatise for a successful ascent. We walk in through Valle Vacas and walk back through Valle Horcones – so we fully circle the Aconcagua, hence the name “Aconcagua 360°. Crossing the Aconcagua is a very special treat. We climb along the “false Polish route” or “polacos falsos” as opposed to the “Polish route”, which describes the ascent via the steep glacier on the east side of the mountain, which was first attempted by a Polish roped party in 1935. Our route, preferred by BCAG, leads around the glacier via Camp II (Guanaco, 5470m) on to Camp III (Colera, 6000m), from where on we can get back onto the normal route after about an hour’s march.

This expedition is guaranteed with a minimum of 2 participants. it’s a must for all aspirants of the Seven Summits, which are most safely climbed with BCAG.

IN PARTNERSHIP WITH ANDES TREK EXPEDITIONS

The Aconcagua 360° Expedition is operated in partnership with Andes Trek Expeditions, a small family guide service run by BCAG guide Pablo Puruncajas. Our partnership combines BCAG’s experience guiding backcountry skiing, remote ski mountaineering, and AIARE avalanche training, with Andes Trek Expeditions decades of experience leading successful expeditions in Ecuador and South America.

AndesTrek_Wp

Personal high porter at the mountain (max 20 kg loads): Different people attempt the Aconcagua for different reasons. Many of them want to carry their equipment on their own but end up reaching their limits and are happy to have someone else carry all or part of their gear. The costs for the high porters can vary depending on the stretch to be covered. The different stretches for porter loads are listed below, the actual cost will be assessed once you request a porter.

Estimate costs:

Base camp (Plaza Argentina)–camp I: USD 160
Camp I–camp II: USD 270
Camp II–camp III (Colera): USD 380
Camp III–Plaza de Mulas: USD 220
Another possibility is hiring a personal porter. A personal porter during the climb (ascent and descent) costs about USD 1200. However, it makes more sense (and it usually is cheaper) to share a porter with other participants, as the costs are always per porter and not depending on the weight (so whether the porter carries 1kg or 20kg doesn’t influence the price).

Included in the price of the Aconcagua 360° expedition is the transportation of material which we’re not using from the Plaza Argentina to the Plaza de Mulas during the summit period of our expedition.

 

Day 1: Overnight flight to Santiago, Chile

Day 2: Arrival in Mendoza (760 m / 2,493 ft)
Overnight: Mendoza
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 3: Transfer to Uspallata (2,020 m / 6,690 ft).
Length: 3-4 Hours
Overnight: Uspallata
Accommodation: Hotel
Meal: Breakfast, Dinner

Day 4: Hike to first approach camp
Length: 4 Hours
Overnight: Pampa de Lenas (2,950 m / 9,678 ft)
Accommodation: Tents
Meal: Breakfast, Boxed-lunch, Dinner

Day 5: Hike to second approach camp
Length: 6 Hours
Overnight: Casa de Piedra (3,240 m / 10,630 ft)
Accommodation: Tents
Meal: Breakfast, Boxed-lunch, Dinner

Day 6: Hike to base camp
Length: 6-7 Hours
Overnight: Plaza Argentina (4,190 m / 13,747 ft)
Accommodation: Tents
Meal: Breakfast, Boxed-lunch, Dinner

Day 7: Rest day at base camp
Overnight: Plaza Argentina
Accommodation: Tents
Meal: Breakfast, Boxed-lunch, Dinner

Day 8: Equipment carry to first high camp (4,970 m / 16,300 ft)
Length: 5 Hours
Overnight: Plaza Argentina
Accommodation: Tents
Meal: Breakfast, Boxed-lunch, Dinner

Day 9: Rest day at base camp
Overnight: Plaza Argentina
Accommodation: Tents
Meal: Breakfast, Boxed-lunch, Dinner

Day 10: Move to first high camp
Length: 4-5 Hours
Overnight: Camp I
Accommodation: Tents
Meal: Breakfast, Boxed-lunch, Dinner

Day 11: Equipment carry to Camp II (Guanaco, 5520m)
Length: 4-5 Hours
Overnight: Camp I
Accommodation: Tents
Meal: Breakfast, Boxed-lunch, Dinner

Day 12: Rest day at camp I
Overnight: Camp I
Accommodation: Tents
Meal: Breakfast, Boxed-lunch, Dinner

Day 13: Move to second high camp
Length: 5 Hours
Overnight: Camp II (Chopper Camp)
Accommodation: Tent
Meal: Breakfast, Boxed-lunch, Dinner

Day 14: Equipment carry to Camp III (Colera, 6000m)
Overnight: Camp II
Accommodation: Tents
Meal: Breakfast, Boxed-lunch, Dinner

Day 15: Move to third high camp
Length: 4-5 Hours
Overnight: Camp III (Colera Camp)
Accommodation: Tent
Meal: Breakfast, Boxed-lunch, Dinne

Day 16: Summit day (6,962 m / 22,841 ft)
Overnight: Camp III
Accommodation: Tents
Meal: Breakfast, Boxed-lunch, Dinner

Day 17: Extra summit attempt
Overnight: Camp III
Accommodation: Tents
Meal: Breakfast, Boxed-lunch, Dinner

Day 18: Descend down to the normal route base camp
Overnight: Plaza de Mulas (4,190 m / 13,747 ft)
Accommodation: Tents
Meal: Breakfast, Boxed-lunch, Dinner 

Day 19: Hike out to the park entrance at Horcones Valley. Bus drive from Uspallata to Mendoza
Length: Hike 6-7 Hours Drive 3-4 Hours
Overnight: Mendoza
Accommodation: Hotel
Meal: Breakfast, Boxed-lunch 

Day 20: Fly home
Meal: Breakfast

Note:

Every effort will be made to adhere to the itinerary, but unforeseen circumstances may require last minute changes. Weather conditions, road conditions, vehicle breakdowns and the health of climbers can all contribute to schedule alterations. Please be prepared to be flexible when necessary.

Requirements
The expedition is challenging and strenuous.
You must know your own limits on the trip and be ready to retreat if need be.
The guide is responsible for leading the entire group. It is not the guide’s responsibility to offer individual personal support. Nevertheless, each participant must be ready to comply with the guide’s decisions. The decisions are made in the interest of the travel group.
Depending on the conditions on site, improvisation and changes to the programme can be necessary.
BCAG do not assume any liability for accidents, damages or loss of material.

Preparation meeting (optional)
Opportunities to meet the guide staff prior to the trip can be arranged in Munich and Seattle to go over logistics, equipment questions and purchases as well as any additional details you need clarified before the start of the trip.

Travel Documents
Your passport must be valid at least 6 months after the return date. No visas required for stays of 90 days or less. However, prior to arrival in Argentina, U.S. citizen tourist and business travelers must pay a $160 reciprocity fee.

Vaccination
The following vaccinations are highly recommended for worldwide travel: poliomyelitis, tetanus.
Current vaccination recommendations can be looked up at:
CDC

Insurance
Insurance (e.g. cancellation, health insurance for abroad, rescue costs, accident, repatriation, luggage) is the responsibility of the participant. Please check in your health and accident policy for “worldwide” option. We highly recommend cancellation insurance.

Climate
Due to being very arid, the north of Argentina is subject to great daily variation in temperature.
The Aconcagua is known for its low humidity, low oxygen level and heavy winds.
In summer, temperatures at night may drop as low as -20°C at 5000m of altitude. On the summit, temperatures can be as low as -30°C. While a light polar jacket might be needed for the summit, the temperatures at base camp can be mild enough for shorts.
According to our experience, the best time to climb the Aconcagua is mid December till end of March.

Registration deadline
Early registration will guarantee your spot and facilitates the administrative work of BCAG tremendously. For travel offers with included train or flight journey, early registration is indispensable. We are always happy to receive registrations on short notice; however, this may induce a surcharge.